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Tags: cdc | beyfortus | baby | rsv | medication | newborn | fda

CDC: Shortage of Key Baby Drug Beyfortus Raises Concern

By    |   Tuesday, 24 October 2023 07:37 PM EDT

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is urging physicians to prioritize the distribution of novel RSV medication, Beyfortus, to the most susceptible infants due to limited availability, reported Axios.

The demand for Beyfortus has significantly exceeded its supply during the inaugural respiratory virus season since its FDA endorsement in July.

Dr. Buddy Creech, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, remarked, "RSV season is here. "We are seeing a substantial increase in the amount of RSV such that in many areas, it has become the most commonly identified respiratory virus causing disease in children," reported NBC News.

"This is one of the reasons why there's probably a lot of scrambling going on," he said, "to identify those babies at highest risk and to try to prioritize them since it's such a limited resource right now."

On October 13, pharmaceutical company Sanofi issued a statement expressing that, despite implementing a robust supply strategy designed to surpass previous pediatric vaccine introductions, the demand for their product, particularly the 100 mg doses primarily administered to infants born before the RSV season, has exceeded initial projections.

During their first RSV seasons, newborns and infants are eligible to receive doses of Beyfortus, with the possibility of second doses in their second RSV seasons for children up to the age of 2 who are at high risk of severe illness from the virus.

According to the CDC alert, the availability of the highest dosage, 100 milligrams, is limited. The agency has instructed doctors to prioritize these 100 mg doses for infants at the highest risk of severe RSV, including those under six months old and those with underlying medical conditions. Simultaneously, the CDC has recommended that doctors reserve 50 mg doses for infants weighing less than 11 pounds.

An alternative approach to thwarting RSV infections in infants involves using the antibody drug Synagis. Nevertheless, Synagis is exclusively sanctioned for administration to high-risk infants and is confined to the RSV season.

Furthermore, in August, the FDA approved the RSV vaccine Abrysvo to be administered to pregnant women in their third trimesters. This measure protects their offspring during the initial six months of life.

There have been no identified issues regarding the quality or operational aspects impacting the production of Beyfortus.

Jim Thomas

Jim Thomas is a writer based in Indiana. He holds a bachelor's degree in Political Science, a law degree from U.I.C. Law School, and has practiced law for more than 20 years.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is urging physicians to prioritize the distribution of novel RSV medication, Beyfortus, to the most susceptible infants due to limited availability, reported Axios.
cdc, beyfortus, baby, rsv, medication, newborn, fda, shortage, illness, virus, distribution
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2023-37-24
Tuesday, 24 October 2023 07:37 PM
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