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Tags: John Boehner | alliances | Barack Obama | Nancy Pelosi

Spending Bill Fight Brings Out New, Surprising Alliances

By    |   Friday, 12 December 2014 12:38 PM EST

Thursday night's close-call vote on the $1 trillion bipartisan House bill may well be a preview of the divisions that will come into play in next year's Congress, with votes being divided by stance rather than party line.

On one side of the issue, there was President Barack Obama, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., pushing for the House bill, while on the other side, House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren, and Texas Republican Sen. Ted Cruz were pushing to reject it, reports NBC News.

"Call it the governing wings vs. the populist wings," NBC correspondent Chuck Todd commented Friday morning.

The issue is, NBC reported, is that conservative opposition to Boehner is mounting, Obama is no longer respected by congressional members of his own party, and a growing group of lawmakers is willing to make deals to pass essential bills.

Perhaps most surprising was Pelosi's anger at the White House. She said she was "extremely disappointed" in Obama for supporting the spending bill, and other Democrats turned against the president as well.

"The president and the vice president are free to make their calls, but they don't have a vote on the floor of the House," New York Rep. Steve Israel commented.

Further, Israel called the bill a "a one-two punch at middle-class voters. It weakens financial regulation on big banks and rewards Congress for doing so by increasing donation limits of big donors," reports The New York Times.

"This is exactly why middle-class voters have a contempt of Congress."

In addition, Maxine Waters, from Pelosi's home state of California, commented that "we're fighting anybody lobbying for this bill, including the president."

House Democrats met for three hours on Thursday night, reports The New York Times, while Pelosi and other more liberal members tried to gather support against the bill.

They said rejecting the bill would allow Democrats to establish their connection with the middle class, and also were concerned that next year, when Republicans control the chambers, they will face even more problems getting bills passed.

"We’ve got to stand up for principle at some point, or they’re going to kick us even more next year when they have a bigger majority," said Oregon Democratic Rep. Peter A. DeFazio. "They know we will stand our ground on principle in the future and not roll us so easily again."

The Democrats were also angry at White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonough, saying Obama undercut Pelosi and others by supporting the bill early in the day, long before the vote was taken.

Pelosi, though, told her members they should vote as they see fit, the Times reported.
"I’m giving you the leverage to do what you have to do," she said. "We have enough votes to show them never to do this again."

Meanwhile, many of the House Democrats left after elections in 2010 and 2014 are the ones deemed as ultra liberals, minorities and urban unions, all of whom are ready to take up their fights with Obama and the White House, said NBC.

The close vote also showed that the inter-party rifts among Democrats are deepening since the election, as many congressional Democrats consider Obama to be less powerful.

But there are also many conservatives who are angry at Boehner for his role in brokering the bill. Sixty seven members of the House Republican Caucus voted against the spending bill, while the other 162 voted for it, and with that many Republicans voting against Boehner, he will need to rely on Democrats to help get his House votes passed, even with Republicans controlling both Congressional chambers in 2015.

There were early signs about the legislation facing troubles, reports the Times. The deal almost did not pass procedural hurdles to allow it to be put up for a vote.

The support wavered, with Democrats calling for a vote and Republicans holding the matter open while trying to persuade two more lawmakers to change their votes.

Meanwhile, White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest, said the White House agrees with Democrats who were angered over the bill's provisions that affect financial regulations and allow larger political contributions during federal campaigns.

But he pointed out the new bill is a "compromise" that will be good for the economy while bolstering presidential priorities such as early childhood education, consumer protections, and on climate change.

© 2022 Newsmax. All rights reserved.


Newsfront
Thursday night's close-call vote on the $1 trillion bipartisan House bill may well be a preview of the divisions that will come into play in next year's Congress, with votes being divided by stance rather than party line.
John Boehner, alliances, Barack Obama, Nancy Pelosi
732
2014-38-12
Friday, 12 December 2014 12:38 PM
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