Tags: energy drinks | kids | caffeine | sugar | adhd | anxiety | sleep disturbance

Energy Drinks Linked to Depression, ADHD in Kids

several different canned energy drinks
(Dreamstime)

By    |   Thursday, 01 February 2024 03:15 PM EST

A new systematic review found that young people who consume energy drinks may experience sleep disturbances and have an increased risk for ADHD, anxiety, mood changes, and in severe cases, heart complications. Researchers from Newcastle University in the UK say that high levels of caffeine and sugar in these beverages are the most likely culprits, says Medical News Today.

The new findings add to the growing evidence of the potential harmful effects of energy drinks. According to Healthline, more than 30% of teens ages 12-17 consume these beverages on a regular basis.

Researchers examined 57 studies about the effects of energy drinks on children and young people up to the age of 21. They analyzed data from January 2016 through July 2022.

The results showed that male teens consumed more energy drinks than females. Researchers also found an association between energy drink consumption and harmful behaviors like smoking, alcohol, and drug use.

Additional effects of consuming these beverages in both male and female teens included:

• Short sleep duration.

• Poor quality of sleep.

• Low academic performance.

• Greater risk of suicide.

• Psychological distress.

• Symptoms of ADHD.

• Depression.

• Panic and anxiety disorders.

“The results are not surprising,” says Cesar Sauza, a registered dietitian who was not involved in the study but has observed similar behavior in his own practice. “In clinical practice I have seen energy drinks affect children negatively with their academic performance, likely due to altered sleep. Another reason the findings are not surprising is that most energy drinks are high in sugar and caffeine, both of which have negative effects on children when over-consumed.”

The Newcastle researchers said their findings were strong enough to suggest policy changes that could go into effect to better children’s health.

“We have raised concerns about the health impacts of these drinks for the best part of a decade after finding that they were being sold to children as young as 10 years old and are cheaper than bottled water,” said Amelia Lake, a professor of public health nutrition from Fuse, the Centre for Translational Research in Public Health at Teesside University in England in a press release. “We need to take action now to protect them from these risks.”

Lake has been involved in a national campaign, funded by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, to restrict the sale of energy drinks to teenagers. According to data from the Center for Science in the Public Interest energy drinks can contain up to 316 milligrams (mg) of caffeine, the equivalent of more than three cups of coffee. The large “Charged Lemonade” sold at Panera was linked to two deaths. A large contains 390 mg of caffeine. While it wasn’t labeled as an energy drink, it also had high levels of sugar.

Experts recommend that parents talk to their children about the inherent dangers of these drinks and serve as examples by not consuming them either as they have no nutritional value, says Healthline.

© 2024 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Health-News
A new systematic review found that young people who consume energy drinks may experience sleep disturbances and have an increased risk for ADHD, anxiety, mood changes, and in severe cases, heart complications. Researchers from Newcastle University in the UK say that high...
energy drinks, kids, caffeine, sugar, adhd, anxiety, sleep disturbance
497
2024-15-01
Thursday, 01 February 2024 03:15 PM
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