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Tags: osteoporosis | inflammation | aging

Studies Link Inflammation to Bone Loss

Erika Schwartz, M.D By Thursday, 23 July 2015 04:21 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Aging produces increasing circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-Alpha), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interleukin 1 (IL-1). These cytokines create aging, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, dementia, and of course, thin bones.

Inflammatory burden may be an important biological risk factor for osteoporosis and hip fractures in older women.

Ten observational studies have analyzed the role of inflammatory markers in bone loss and fracture, and they all suggest a strong association.

Recently, even a study on men in Taiwan has made the connection between sleep apnea — a disease of inflammation — and osteoporosis. The underlying mechanism in all cases seems to be inflammation.

As we pay more attention to inflammation in the prevention field, we realize that most diseases of aging are connected to inflammation, and thus the need to eradicate or at least control inflammation will lead to improved outcome.

To decrease inflammation, we turn again to nutrition, foods that have no GMOs, are high in protein of vegetable origin, with no alcohol or caffeine, limited amounts of sugar (especially processed types), and increased amounts of non-animal fats, like olive oil, coconut oil, and avocado oil.

Also, decreasing the amount of dairy, wheat flour, corn, potatoes, and rice helps decrease inflammatory changes, leading to healthier aging and healthy bones.

Other important ways to avoid inflammation are not smoking and drinking lots of water that is as alkaline as possible, since acidity increases inflammation.

Osteoporosis is limited when these steps are undertaken, along with all other aging processes.

© 2022 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Dr-Schwartz
Inflammatory burden may be an important biological risk factor for osteoporosis and hip fractures in older women.
osteoporosis, inflammation, aging
250
2015-21-23
Thursday, 23 July 2015 04:21 PM
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