×
Newsmax TV & Webwww.newsmax.comFREE - In Google Play
VIEW
×
Newsmax TV & Webwww.newsmax.comFREE - On the App Store
VIEW
Drs. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: walking | blood pressure | heart attack | dr. oz

Get Up, Get Moving, Reduce Blood Pressure

Dr. Mehmet Oz, M.D. and Dr. Mike Roizen, M.D. By Thursday, 16 April 2020 01:58 PM Current | Bio | Archive

When the NCAA canceled its Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament — also known as March Madness — it was only a matter of time until one group or another decided to come up with a substitute tournament, with brackets and all.

But we never could have guessed it would be for the ultimate stand-up comic.

The final round put Norm Macdonald up against Dave Chappelle, and Macdonald came out the winner, taking 53.49% of the 18,020 votes cast.

We owe a lot to the stand-ups. They deliver laughter that raises our spirits and dispels our stress.

And it seems that standing up and moving around starting first thing in the morning can do that for you too.

A new study in the journal Hypertension reveals that adding a 30-minute morning walk to an otherwise sedentary day helps obese people ages 55 to 80 lower their blood pressure.

Over three weeks, sedentary folks who did the rise-and-shine walk saw their systolic (top) number fall by an average of 3.4 points and their diastolic (bottom) number by as much as 1.6 points.

Those who added a pattern of standing up every 30 minutes and three minutes of light-intensity walking to the morning 30-minute walk saw their top number go down an average of 5.1 points and the lower number decline by up to 1.8.

In addition, women saw their levels of the stress hormone epinephrine decline by 12% to 13%.

Making these small changes to the daily pattern of inactivity can help protect against high blood pressure-related heart attack and stroke. And that's no laughing matter.

© King Features Syndicate


Dr-Oz
A new study in the journal Hypertension reveals that adding a 30-minute morning walk to an otherwise sedentary day helps obese people ages 55 to 80 lower their blood pressure.
walking, blood pressure, heart attack, dr. oz
262
2020-58-16
Thursday, 16 April 2020 01:58 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.

Sign up for Newsmax’s Daily Newsletter

Receive breaking news and original analysis - sent right to your inbox.

(Optional for Local News)
Privacy: We never share your email address.
Join the Newsmax Community
Read and Post Comments
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
 
Find Your Condition
Get Newsmax Text Alerts
TOP

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved