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Drs. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: vitamin D | muscle mass | aging | Dr. Oz
OPINION

Vitamin D Helps Maintain Aging Muscles

Dr. Mehmet Oz, M.D. and Dr. Mike Roizen, M.D. By Monday, 25 November 2019 12:24 PM EST Current | Bio | Archive

A search for athletes named Dee turns up a short list: There's Dee Virgil Fondy, who played major league baseball from 1951 to 1958, and was the last player to bat at Brooklyn’s Ebbets Field; Dee Hardison, a defensive lineman for the Buffalo Bills, New York Giants, San Diego Chargers, and Kansas City Chiefs in the 1970s and 1980s; and DeCovan “Dee” Brown, who spent 12 seasons in the NBA and won the league's Slam Dunk Contest in 1991.

Their strengths were moxie and muscle. That’s something another D — vitamin D — definitely contributes.

A study out of Trinity College Dublin reveals that just as regular exercise is essential for maintaining muscle mass and function as you age, so is sufficient vitamin D.

The researchers tested blood levels of vitamin D in 4,157 people 60 and older, and then assessed their grip strength and tested their balance, agility, gait speed, and ability to rise from a chair without using their hands.

Those with the lowest blood levels of vitamin D — below 30 nmol/L, the level signaling deficiency and onset of bone disease — had twice the muscle weakness and three times the difficulty with muscle performance as people with a level of 50 nmol/L or more.

For major-league performance as you age, get an annual blood test to determine what supplementation you need to achieve a level of 50-80 nmol/L.

Until then, if you're over 50 take 2,000 IU of D2 or D3 daily. You can also get vitamin D from foods such as salmon, most cultivated mushrooms, and D-fortified cereals and soy milk.

© King Features Syndicate


Dr-Oz
A study out of Trinity College Dublin reveals that just as regular exercise is essential for maintaining muscle mass and function as you age, so is sufficient vitamin D.
vitamin D, muscle mass, aging, Dr. Oz
262
2019-24-25
Monday, 25 November 2019 12:24 PM
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