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Drs. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: eat | early | heart | health
OPINION

Dine Early for Better Heart Health

Dr. Mehmet Oz, M.D. and Dr. Mike Roizen, M.D. By Wednesday, 18 December 2019 10:00 AM EST Current | Bio | Archive

Earlier this year, pop star Taylor Swift confessed to Ellen DeGeneres that when she can't sleep she rummages through her kitchen like “a raccoon in a dumpster,” eating whatever she can find. And, she says, when she wakes up she doesn't remember a single bite.

All women, Swift included, need to pay attention to when they are chowing down — not just late at night, but any time after 6 p.m.

Recently, researchers presented a study at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions that found when women (average age 33) ate more of their calories after 6 p.m., they increased their risk for heart disease.

That’s because they're more likely to have high blood pressure, a higher body mass index, and worse long-term control of blood sugar.

In fact, with every 1% increase in calories consumed after 6 p.m., heart health declined.

This happens because in the evening, the body switches from fat-burning mode to fat-storing mode, leading to higher risk for cardiovascular and metabolic problems.

This is one more piece of evidence supporting the idea that, as Dr. Mike says in his book “What to Eat When,” it's best to eat 80% of your daily calories before 2 p.m., and leave at least 13 hours between a light, early dinner and breakfast or lunch.

© King Features Syndicate


Dr-Oz
Earlier this year, pop star Taylor Swift confessed to Ellen DeGeneres that when she can't sleep she rummages through her kitchen like "a raccoon in a dumpster," eating whatever she can find. And, she says, when she wakes up she doesn't remember a single bite.
eat, early, heart, health
214
2019-00-18
Wednesday, 18 December 2019 10:00 AM
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