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Drs. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: dogs | influenza | vaccine | Dr. Oz

Get Your Dog a Flu Shot Too

Dr. Mehmet Oz, M.D. and Dr. Mike Roizen, M.D. By Monday, 04 February 2019 11:54 AM EST Current | Bio | Archive

In Wes Anderson's animated film “Isle of Dogs,” an outbreak of canine influenza rips through the fictional Japanese city of Megasaki. The town's mayor, fearing the virus will spread to humans, banishes all dogs to Trash Island, aka Isle of Dogs.

The ultra-smart exiled pups, missing the great meals their owners once provided, eventually find a way to help upend the government conspiracies that forced them out of town.

This dystopian film is, of course, a work of fiction. In real life, there's never been a documented case of animal-to-human transmission of a dog flu virus. They're called subtype H3N8 and subtype H3N2; each name identifies its antigen.

But it's important to know that your pooch is vulnerable to the virus, and somewhere under 10 percent of infected dogs die of flu-related complications.

Canine influenza is transmitted through droplets that become airborne when a dog breathes, barks, or sneezes. (Cats can catch it from them.) Symptoms include cough, runny nose, fever, lethargy, eye discharge, and reduced appetite.

Treatment will include keeping your dog hydrated and preventing a secondary bacterial infection.

So make the flu shot an annual healthy habit for your entire family — one kind for people and one for dogs that spend a lot of time around other animals in boarding or day-care facilities, parks, or dog runs.

The vaccine is administered in two doses, three weeks apart. And like its human counterpart, getting it early (September or October) makes sense, but it's never too late to help.

© King Features Syndicate


Dr-Oz
Canine influenza is transmitted through droplets that become airborne when a dog breathes, barks, or sneezes. Symptoms include cough, runny nose, fever, lethargy, eye discharge, and reduced appetite.
dogs, influenza, vaccine, Dr. Oz
249
2019-54-04
Monday, 04 February 2019 11:54 AM
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