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Drs. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: diabetes | insulin | strength training | Dr. Oz

Control Diabetes With Strength Training

Dr. Mehmet Oz, M.D. and Dr. Mike Roizen, M.D. By Thursday, 18 July 2019 12:24 PM Current | Bio | Archive

The cartoon character Mighty Mouse made his first appearance in the 1940s. He had many superpowers, including flight, X-ray vision, and the ability to turn back time.

Mighty Mouse was also endowed with super-strength, even though he never did much real weight-training.

These days, however, some energetic mice are working on their muscles, and they have an unusual superpower of their own: They could help us humans figure out how to prevent (or reverse) Type 2 diabetes.

For a new study published in the Journal of Endocrinology, obese diabetic mice took part in a 15-day strength-training program by climbing stairs 20 times at 90-second intervals with weight on their tails.

While the program was not long enough to make them lose weight or change body shape, the activity led to reduced levels of fat around their livers and improved glucose regulation.

By the end of the experiment, the mice's fasting blood sugar levels were normal.

Studies of humans identify similar benefits of weight- and resistance-training. One study of people with diabetes found that muscle-building, high-intensity resistance training resulted in a 16% increase in insulin sensitivity after six weeks.

If you have prediabetes or are diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, you should consider incorporating weight- and/or resistance-training into your routine two to three times a week.

You can use hand weights and stretchy bands at home and weight machines at the gym, and/or take a class that uses your own body weight to work your muscles (calisthenics, Pilates, or yoga).

© King Features Syndicate


Dr-Oz
One study of people with diabetes found that muscle-building, high-intensity resistance training resulted in a 16% increase in insulin sensitivity after six weeks.
diabetes, insulin, strength training, Dr. Oz
249
2019-24-18
Thursday, 18 July 2019 12:24 PM
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