×
Newsmax TV & Webwww.newsmax.comFREE - In Google Play
VIEW
×
Newsmax TV & Webwww.newsmax.comFREE - On the App Store
VIEW
Drs. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: dehydration | headache | heartbeat | Dr. Oz

Watch for Signs of Dehydration

Dr. Mehmet Oz, M.D. and Dr. Mike Roizen, M.D. By Friday, 26 October 2018 11:11 AM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

A thirst for knowledge; a thirst for power; people get thirsty for lots of things. But that's not surprising when you consider that our bodies are between 50 percent (women) and 65 percent (men) water.

And that’s why it's so important to stay hydrated.

Yet dehydration can happen to almost anyone, at any time of the year, whether or not they're playing sports or working out. It hits when you lose more than 2 percent of your body weight through a water deficit.

The signs are thirst (if you're working out, drink before thirst sets in) and cold legs (especially if you're not working out) progressing to dark urine, dizziness, cramps, constipation, headache, and flaky skin.

While it can knock anyone off his or her feet — and into the emergency room — it's especially a concern for those who work out or avoid drinking water and older folks, who may forget to drink water regularly.

Dehydration can upset the sodium/water balance in your blood and body, and that destabilizes your heartbeat (your heart is 73 percent water) as well as the health of your muscles (75 percent water), brain, and all other organs.

How much water does it take to stay hydrated? The Institute of Medicine of the National Academies says thirst can be your guide, but about 91 ounces of water daily (80 percent from drinking; 20 percent from foods) should be enough for women; 125 ounces a day for men.

Those who live in hot climates or exercise may need more.

© 2022 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Dr-Oz
Dehydration can upset the sodium/water balance in your blood and body, and that destabilizes your heartbeat as well as the health of your muscles, brain, and all other organs.
dehydration, headache, heartbeat, Dr. Oz
252
2018-11-26
Friday, 26 October 2018 11:11 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.

Sign up for Newsmax’s Daily Newsletter

Receive breaking news and original analysis - sent right to your inbox.

(Optional for Local News)
Privacy: We never share your email address.
Join the Newsmax Community
Read and Post Comments
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
 
Find Your Condition
Get Newsmax Text Alerts
TOP

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved