×
Newsmax TV & Webwww.newsmax.comFREE - In Google Play
VIEW
×
Newsmax TV & Webwww.newsmax.comFREE - On the App Store
VIEW
Drs. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: bacteriophage | blood sugar | depression | Dr. Oz

Balancing Gut Bacteria Protects Mind Health

Dr. Mehmet Oz, M.D. and Dr. Mike Roizen, M.D. By Thursday, 05 March 2020 12:06 PM Current | Bio | Archive

The fifth episode in season one of "Star Trek: Voyager" (1995) was titled "The Phage." It tells the tale of the Vidiians, an alien people who are combing the universe looking for healthy organs to harvest in an attempt to outpace their physical degeneration, which is caused by an incurable disease called the Phage.  

The Vidiians were off the mark. We now know that good health depends, in part, on cultivating bacteriophage, not destroying them. Bacteriophage (also called bacterial viruses) are viruses that infect bacteria and replicate within them.

According to researchers from San Diego State University, you can cultivate them by changing your diet. 

The study, published in the journal Gut Microbes, shows that some foods help maintain a healthy balance of bacteria in your digestive system by encouraging bacteriophage to infiltrate and replicate inside disease-promoting gut bacteria.

As sci-fi as that sounds, when the replicating bacteriophage knock out harmful bacteria, they can help protect cognition, make it easier to regulate blood sugar, and reduce the risk for depression and body-wide inflammation.   

But the researchers warn that you don't want to overdo it. Eating too many antimicrobial foods could contribute to low microbiome diversity, causing the same problems for your gut and overall health that overuse of antibiotics does.  

So what plant products — in moderation — may help maintain or restore balance in your gut biome?

The researchers tested foods with known antimicrobial effects: honey, licorice, stevia, hot sauce, oregano, cinnamon, clove, and rhubarb.

They found that the most powerful triggers of bacteriophage production that you can eat were honey and stevia, although the others listed above are also beneficial.

© King Features Syndicate


Dr-Oz
Some foods help maintain a healthy balance of bacteria in your digestive system by encouraging bacteriophage to infiltrate and replicate inside disease-promoting gut bacteria.
bacteriophage, blood sugar, depression, Dr. Oz
270
2020-06-05
Thursday, 05 March 2020 12:06 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.

Sign up for Newsmax’s Daily Newsletter

Receive breaking news and original analysis - sent right to your inbox.

(Optional for Local News)
Privacy: We never share your email address.
Join the Newsmax Community
Read and Post Comments
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
 
Find Your Condition
Get Newsmax Text Alerts
TOP

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved