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Drs. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: aspirin | heart attack | cancer | Dr. Oz
OPINION

Importance of Daily Low-Dose Aspirin

Dr. Mehmet Oz, M.D. and Dr. Mike Roizen, M.D. By Tuesday, 29 May 2018 04:29 PM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

In one episode of the animated series "Rugrats," Angelica tries to kick her cookie addiction. But when she finds a stash of them, the gang chases her (and the cookie jar) into the laundry room, where the cookies go flying into a tub of soapy water.

Angelica eats them anyway. Suddenly, she feels sick and begins burping bubbles. "Never let me eat cookies again," she pleads.

Withdrawal is hard, but luckily there's one drug you don't need to, and probably shouldn't, try to quit: aspirin.

Have you and your doc decided that you should be taking a low-dose aspirin once or twice a day to lower your risk of heart attack, stroke, or colorectal cancer?

A new study in the journal Circulation reinforces several other studies we mentioned in our book "YOU: Staying Young, the Owner's Manual for Extending Your Warranty."

Stopping your daily aspirin regimen, either for surgery or because you just forget for a few days, can have serious consequences.

Looking at data on more than 600,000 people who were taking a daily low-dose aspirin, researchers found those who had any gaps in treatment boosted their risk of a cardiovascular event by more than 30 percent.

One theory: If you stop taking aspirin, there's a rebound effect and your body produces more thromboxane, a hormone that promotes clotting and artery constriction.

So if you're thinking of stopping aspirin therapy, talk to your doctor to make sure you're either on another med that prevents clotting or that the benefits of stopping clearly outweigh the risks.

© 2024 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Dr-Oz
Have you and your doc decided that you should be taking a low-dose aspirin once or twice a day to lower your risk of heart attack, stroke, or colorectal cancer?
aspirin, heart attack, cancer, Dr. Oz
256
2018-29-29
Tuesday, 29 May 2018 04:29 PM
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