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Drs. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: anxiety | stress | medications | Dr. Oz
OPINION

How to Dial Back Anxiety

Dr. Mehmet Oz, M.D. and Dr. Mike Roizen, M.D. By Tuesday, 22 May 2018 04:27 PM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

In 1977, Mel Brooks made a parody of Alfred Hitchcock suspense films. Hitchcock even worked with Brooks on the screenplay, which was called "High Anxiety."

Brooks played Dr. Richard Thorndyke of the Psycho-Neurotic Institute for the Very, Very Nervous. It's a ridiculous send-up, and the film certainly doesn't take itself seriously.

But if someone you know has an anxiety disorder — where those minor stresses cause major life disruptions or trigger phobias such as a fear of heights, crowds, closed spaces, or doctor's offices — then you know it's no laughing matter.

Fortunately, we've gained insight into how to dial back those apprehensive feelings, so a person with anxiety can enjoy life and escape the health issues (headache, heart woes, digestive upset, depression) that they can trigger.

If you have a loved one with anxiety issues, here are smart steps to improve both your lives:

1. Discuss anxious feelings — gently. Stress that there's no shame in needing help with something that is so difficult to control on your own.

2. Be aware of and kind about your partner's issues, but don't distort the environment to accommodate his or her symptoms. In other words, don't alter your life to placate people with anxiety. Instead, support them when they don't give in to their symptoms.

3. Encourage the person to seek treatment; it is remarkably effective these days.

4. Talk about the benefits of combining talk therapy with medications.

© 2024 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Dr-Oz
If someone you know has an anxiety disorder — where those minor stresses cause major life disruptions or trigger phobias such as a fear of heights, crowds, closed spaces, or doctor's offices — then you know it's no laughing matter.
anxiety, stress, medications, Dr. Oz
235
2018-27-22
Tuesday, 22 May 2018 04:27 PM
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