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Drs. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: altitude | nosebleeds | cauterization | Dr. Oz
OPINION

Tips for Dealing With Nosebleeds

Dr. Mehmet Oz, M.D. and Dr. Mike Roizen, M.D. By Wednesday, 19 June 2019 01:04 PM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

Did the Fonz (Henry Winkler) know that mountain climbers often get nosebleeds at high altitudes because as the amount of oxygen in the air decreases and the air becomes drier, blood vessels inside your nose can crack and bleed? Apparently he did.

In one episode of “Happy Days,” when Fonz ends up sitting near the top of the cheap seats at a concert, he remarks, “A guy could get a nosebleed up here.”

And that's the origin of the term “nosebleed seats.”

For kids, nosebleeds aren't something to joke about. They are pretty common from ages 3 to 10 (due to dry air or nose-picking), and the remedies are the same as they are for a mountain climber: Sit or lean slightly forward and allow blood to exit the nose; then, firmly pinch the nose closed just below the upper bony part.

If you can, use a dark towel to wipe off the blood. That might make it less distressing for a child.

Then check to see if the bleeding has stopped after five minutes (15 for a mountain climber).

Don't pack a bloody nose with gauze or tissue unless it's a last-ditch effort to stop the bleeding before you head to an urgent care center. The reason: When you remove the tissue, you may remove a formed scab, and the bleeding can start again.

If a child's nosebleeds become chronic, see a specialist who may perform a cauterization. It's a safe and effective heat-sealing of a weak blood vessel.

© King Features Syndicate


Dr-Oz
If a child's nosebleeds become chronic, see a specialist who may perform a cauterization. It's a safe and effective heat-sealing of a weak blood vessel.
altitude, nosebleeds, cauterization, Dr. Oz
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2019-04-19
Wednesday, 19 June 2019 01:04 PM
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