Chauncey W. Crandall, M.D., F.A.C.C.

Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

If we get too high levels in our blood, some of the fat can coat the heart’s coronary arteries, narrowing them. [Full Story]
If we get too high levels in our blood, some of the fat can coat the heart’s coronary arteries, narrowing them. [Full Story]
A study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine found that sleeping longer helps reduce your caloric intake. [Full Story]
Diets high in saturated fats, trans fats, and cholesterol , which are found in meat, dairy products, and eggs , raise body cholesterol levels, increasing heart attack risk. [Full Story]
The practice of using stem cells to regenerate failing hearts took a major step forward with the publication of a study that showed the treatment could cut the risk of cardiac events and even death in people with heart failure. [Full Story]
Too often, healthcare professionals look to drugs to maintain metabolic health, a key factor in aging and chronic disease. But it’s what you eat that can cause , or prevent , these conditions from developing in the first place. [Full Story]
Compared to women who had babies but never breastfed, mothers who breastfed for any period of time were less likely to develop heart disease, have a stroke, or die from heart disease during 10 years of follow-up. [Full Story]
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 100 million U.S. adults have diabetes or prediabetes. [Full Story]
People undergoing immune-boosting therapy for advanced melanoma may respond better if they eat a high-fiber diet, according to a study published in the journal Science. [Full Story]
A Chinese research team surveyed more than 5,000 couples living in seven regions of China and found that people whose spouse had heart disease were more than twice as likely to develop it as well. [Full Story]

View More Articles

Get Newsmax Text Alerts
TOP

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved