×
Newsmax TV & Webwww.newsmax.comFREE - In Google Play
VIEW
×
Newsmax TV & Webwww.newsmax.comFREE - On the App Store
VIEW
Tags: Nabhan | climate | change | drought

Scientist: Warmer Temperatures Are Threatening Food Supplies

By    |   Tuesday, 23 July 2013 07:50 AM

The United States will face a food crisis unless farmers adapt to climate change, warns Gary Paul Nabhan, scientist at the Southwest Center at the University of Arizona, in an op-ed for The New York Times.

Drought and heat waves continue to strike vast swaths of farm and ranch lands with increasing frequency, says Nabhan.

Consumers should expect to pay higher prices as costs of pumping water to drought-impacted areas are passed along, as approximately 40 percent of the net farm income for the country generally comes from the 17 Western states that have been experiencing a drought for the past few years.

Editor's Note:
How You Lost $85,000 During the Last Decade. See the Numbers.

The current solution, crop insurance payouts to farmers, is only a short-term solution to a long-term problem, Nabhan explains.

"Last year, some farmers made more from insurance payments than from selling their products, meaning we are dangerously close to subsidizing farmers for not adapting to changing climate conditions."

Fortunately, farmers and ranchers have many drought-fighting strategies at their disposal, says Nabhan, author of "Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land: Lessons from Desert Farmers in Adapting to Climate Uncertainty."

One solution is using locally produced compost to increase the moisture-hold capacity of soils. Organic wastes from cities could be sent to farmlands if cities could sort and compost their organic wastes.

Moreover, harvesting rainwater and waste water from private lands could add to the water supply, and perennial agriculture, such as edible tree crops and perennial grass pastures, would keep more carbon in the soil and use less fossil fuel to produce. In addition, the United States could finance efforts to develop crops that are more resistant to heat and drought.

Investing in climate-change adoption is more cost effective than doling out billions in crop insurance is, Nabhan argues.

The problem is that agribusiness organizations, fearing that admitting climate change is impacting farmers will lead to more regulations, have blocked federal efforts.

"Its now up to our political and business leaders to get their heads out of the hot sand and do something tangible to implement climate change policy and practices before farmers, ranchers and consumers are further affected. Climate adaptation is the game every food producer and eater must now play."

Many farmers do not believe in climate change, writes David Biello, an associate editor for environment and energy at Scientific American, in an article for Slate.

An Iowa State University poll of Corn Belt farmers found that 66 percent believe the climate is changing, but just 41 percent believe the change is caused by human activity.

"We're not convinced that the climate change we're seeing is anthropogenic in origin. We don't think the science is there to show that in a convincing way," says Thornton, a spokesperson for the National Farm Bureau.

Editor's Note: How You Lost $85,000 During the Last Decade. See the Numbers.

© 2022 Newsmax Finance. All rights reserved.


Economy
The United States will face a food crisis unless farmers adapt to climate change, warns Gary Paul Nabhan, scientist at the Southwest Center at the University of Arizona, in an op-ed for The New York Times.
Nabhan,climate,change,drought
483
2013-50-23
Tuesday, 23 July 2013 07:50 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.

Sign up for Newsmax’s Daily Newsletter

Receive breaking news and original analysis - sent right to your inbox.

(Optional for Local News)
Privacy: We never share your email address.
Join the Newsmax Community
Read and Post Comments
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
 
Get Newsmax Text Alerts
TOP

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
MONEYNEWS.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
NEWSMAX.COM
MONEYNEWS.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved